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Sexual Assault Prevention and Resources

Spring Arbor University has well-defined community standards outlined in the Student Handbook which can be found at www.arbor.edu/studenthandbook. In addition to those community standards, federal law requires every university to educate students and employees specifically regarding domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and sexual assault. Spring Arbor University prohibits these offenses and has established resources and support for victims of these offenses. The College has a clear interest in taking reasonable and appropriate measures to ensure that our environment is conducive to living and learning, and free from sexual misconduct.

Even with established community standards SAU students are not immune to the issue of sexual assault. Some national surveys estimate that up to 25% of college women and up to 10% of college men are subjected to unwanted sexual contact during their time in college. Peer pressure and concerns about the reaction of others can make it difficult for survivors of sexual misconduct to come forward, and can sometimes make it hard to understand if sexual misconduct may really have occurred. Sexual misconduct can occur on campus or off, and it can affect both men and women.

The College has a clear interest in taking reasonable and appropriate measures to ensure that our environment is conducive to living and learning, and free from sexual misconduct. In the case of sexual misconduct, we make efforts to educate the community about the issue and available resources, and have developed protocols to respond to allegations of sexual misconduct.

The College has several key responsibilities in responding to allegations of sexual misconduct. See SAU’s full Policy Statement on Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Assault, as well as how to file a report, how such a report will be handled (including statements on confidentiality and retaliation), by visiting www.arbor.edu/studenthandbook.

The State of Michigan has defined these offenses in the following manner:

Sexual assault (often known as rape) is forcing or coercing an individual to engage in any non-consensual sexual contact or sexual penetration. It is also a crime if the assailant is your dating partner or spouse.

Sexual assault

Dating violence is a pattern of assaultive and controlling behaviors that one person uses against another in order to gain or maintain power in the relationship. The abuser intentionally behaves in ways that cause fear, degradation and humiliation to control the other person. Forms of abuse can be physical, sexual, emotional and psychological.

Dating Violence

Domestic Violence means the occurrence of any of the following acts by a person that is not an act of self-defense: causing or attempting to cause physical or mental harm to a family or household member; placing a family or household member in fear of physical or mental harm; causing or attempting to cause a family or household member to engage in involuntary sexual activity by force, threat of force, or duress; and/or engaging in activity toward a family or household member that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested.

Domestic Violence [PDF]

Stalking is a pattern of behavior involving repeated or continuing harassment of another individual that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested, and that actually causes the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested. “Pattern of behavior” is defined as two or more noncontinuous instances which share the same purpose. The term “harassed” is defined as repeated or continuing unconsented contact directed toward a victim resulting in emotional distress.

Stalking [PDF]

Consent is a clear and unambiguous agreement, expressed in mutually understandable words or actions, to engage in a particular activity. Consent can be withdrawn by either party at any point. A person that is incapacitated in any way cannot reasonably offer consent.

Awareness:

What can you do as a friend or bystander?

The goal of bystander intervention is to stop any kind of behavior (including irresponsible or impaired behavior) from crossing the line into sexual misconduct. This may occur because you directly stop it or because you distract one of the people in another way. It’s important to remember that by intervening, you are helping to keep your friends from a potentially dangerous situation by protecting potential victims from harm and by protecting potential perpetrators from actually harming someone.

There’s no right or wrong way to intervene when you sense danger. Here are some examples:

  • Say something directly to the individual who is at risk of harming someone or being harmed.
  • Do something to remove one or both of the individuals from the scene. Ask a friend to help you intervene.
  • Be prepared to have your intervention rejected by those at risk. Don’t be afraid to ask, “Are you okay? Is this what you want?”

You may be in an emotionally abusive relationship if your partner:

  • Calls you names, insults you or continually criticizes you.
  • Does not trust you and acts jealous or possessive.
  • Tries to isolate you from family or friends.
  • Monitors where you go, who you call and who you spend time with.
  • Does not want you to work.
  • Controls finances or refuses to share money.
  • Punishes you by withholding affection.
  • Expects you to ask permission.
  • Threatens to hurt you or those you love.
  • Humiliates you in any way.

You may be in a physically abusive relationship if your partner has ever:

  • Damaged property when angry (thrown objects, punched walls, kicked doors, etc.).
  • Pushed, slapped, bitten, kicked or choked you.
  • Abandoned you in a dangerous or unfamiliar place.
  • Scared you by driving recklessly.
  • Used a weapon to threaten or hurt you.
  • Forced you to leave a location.
  • Trapped you or kept you from leaving a location.
  • Prevented you from calling police or seeking medical attention.
  • Hurt someone or something you love.
  • Used physical force in sexual situations.

You may be in a sexually abusive relationship if your partner:

  • Views people as objects and believes in rigid gender roles.
  • Accuses you of cheating or is often jealous of your outside relationships.
  • Wants you to dress in a sexual way.
  • Insults you in sexual ways or calls you sexual names.
  • Has ever forced or manipulated you into sexual activity.
  • Demanded sexual contact when you were sick, tired or after hurting you.
  • Hurt you with weapons or objects.
  • Involved other people in sexual activities with you.
  • Ignored your feelings regarding sexual activity.

ROLE OF THE COLLEGE

Spring Arbor University has a clear interest in taking reasonable and appropriate measures to ensure that our environment is conducive to living and learning, and free from sexual misconduct. In the case of sexual misconduct, we make efforts to educate the community about the issue and available resources, and have developed protocols to respond to allegations of sexual misconduct.

CAMPUS RESOURCES

To report an incident or emergency:

Campus Safety – 517-750-6911

Director of Campus Safety – Scott Krebill, 157-474-4901

For confidential medical attention and support:

Holton Health & Wellness Center (HHWC) – 517-750-6532

Director of Student Health Services – Mary Ann Broda, Nurse Practitioner –  517-750-6369

Director of Counseling – Carrie Dashner, LLP – 517-750-6381

To report an incident or for additional support:

Student Development & Learning – 517-750-6330

Vice President for Student Development & Learning – Dr. Kim Hayworth – 517-750-6331

Chaplain, Ron Kopicko – 517-750-6336

Residence Life On-Duty Phone – 517-295-1484

For concerns regarding employees, faculty or staff:

Director of Human Resources — 517-750-6426

To contact the Title IX Coordinator:

Associate Vice President for Student Development & Learning – Dan Vander Hill – 517-750-6367

To contact the Title IX Grievance Administrator:

Vice President for Student Development & Learning – Dr. Kim Hayworth – 517-750-6331

Other Resources:

The Aware Shelter — information and referrals for rape, sexual assault, dating and domestic violence:

706 W. Michigan Ave, Jackson, MI 49201 | (517) 783-2861

 

National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)

Adapted from:

www.michigan.gov

www.womenslaw.org